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Noble County - 101 Ranch - George Cornish, Photographer

These postcards show the copyright of George B. Cornish, an Arkansas City, Kansas photographer. He was a protégé and youthful partner of William Prettyman, who produced photographs that tell the history of South-Central Kansas and North Central Oklahoma. Cornish stood with William Pettyman on the platform that hot September day in 1893 when one of history's greatest photographs was made at the opening of the Cherokee Strip. He manned one of the cameras and tried to guess the fraction of a second when a fast-moving scene would reach its dramatic peak. He never revealed which of the three pictures was his. In 1905 William Prettyman moved to the Far West, abandoning his priceless plates in his Arkansas City Gallery.  George preserved the thousands of plates he left behind. Some he protected by copyright in his own name, but these pictures continued to be identified as Prettyman's work. Prettyman never sought a copyright on any of his pictures. Long after Prettyman left Kansas, Cornish produced an album of photographs made from choice plates in his collection. He did not have to include his former partner's name but he titled the album "Oklahoma Views, by Prettyman and Cornish." After the death of Cornish, the plates became a part of the Cunningham Collection, and now are back in the land of their origin. Cornish continued as a photographer in Arkansas City until his death in 1946.

Cherokee Strip Land Rush Museum. http://www.arkcity.org/index.asp?NID=176. January 23, 2007.

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Long Horns
Long Horns
Cowgirl Cowgirl
Indian Chief
Indian Chief
Otoe Indians
Otoe Indians